Martial Arts Thread

Flying Jinko

New member
Hey guys, Im sure many of you here are interested in martial arts especially the various styles of Kung-Fu. Since I am experienced in a number of Kung Fu styles and have been practising for over 10 years, I thought of shedding some light on this wonderful art, so that all those aspiring to learn it can make wise and informed decisions regarding particular styles you would like to practice. It has been known that there are more than 800 styles of Kung Fu and thus a comparison with each of these styles will be impractical. Thus for starters I shall focus on the two main broad classifications of Kung Fu, the Northern Styles and The Southern Styles.

Northern Styles: Fluid, Elegant, Dynamic

If you were to watch someone trained in the northern style of kung fu vs someone trained in the southern style the difference would be apparent. Nothern styles are generally based around much wider stances, much higher kicks and greater mobility. Much of the whirling motion and spin kicks you see are typical of northern styles.

During the times of the Chou Dynasty,Northern China had a much rockier terrain and constant climbing up and down a hill would strengthen the legs of its people. The people from this region were generally of a much taller stature and better able to use long range kicks. With Mongolia to the north there was much greater need to focus army in this region as well. A martial arts style developed primarily for fighting in situations like this would be more fluid. With dynamics of war, one is constantly being pushed or pulled by soldiers on all sides and one must learn very fluid stances in order to react. It would be likely that a martial artist has a weapon in hand so kicks would be extremely useful.

Thus it is typically thought that this environment is what led to the development of northern styles of kung fu, in which kicks are used frequently and there is a lot of movement in one's stance. Northern Styles are characterized by their long range techniques, quick advances and retreats, agility, whirling or circular motions.

Examples: Chang quan, Xing yi quan
(One of Kano's styles in MK:DA)

Southern Styles: Stable, Powerful and Grounded

When the Qing Dynasty overther the Ming, the Shaolin temple in the Fuijan province was destroyed. The Shaolin masters who managed to escape fled to neighbouring provinces and there they developed an insurgency and would often train the locals and peasants to fight against the oppression. Since martial arts was prohibited, it was impossible to train as they have for centuries. The combat they would face was entirely different from clash of armies and the fighting techniques needed to adapt to these conditions.

In the south the terrain was much flatter, with less open spaces. Its people were shorter than those in the north and the cities were cropped up with densely packed buildings, restricting mobility within cities. More combat was also happening in small numbers in city streets. With an insurgent force training in secret, fights were usually one on one or a few fighters at a time, usually in very close proximity to one another in alleyways and streets with densely packed buildings surrounding them. Flourishing kicks and whirling blocks would not be as effective in such close combat, and southern styles adapted to meet these condtions. Martial Arts training was prohibited and hence one could not train in weapons and had to rely on his hands.

Low stances, Low kicks, greater use of hands and stability are all characteristic of southern styles. Many of the strikes are designed to get as much as power out of as little motion as possible and it is in tradition that you commonly hear of the 'one inch punch,' Stances had to be low to the ground, so that the fighter could remain grounded. Much of the fighting philosophy was geared towards economy of motion and restricting any uneccesary movement. (Bruce Lee would later strive to perfect this concept by creating Jeet Kune Do).

Southern styles thus became very external or hard styles. Hands replaced weapons so each strike had to do as much as damage as possible. Kicks were mostly retricted to striking below the waist.

Examples: Wing-Chun, Nan Quan

I hope this was informative to most here. I shall give a brief intro on the shaolin temple styles and animal styles in the next post and then focus on individual styles, stating its pros, cons and to what kind of people it would be suitable etc so that all aspirants can make informed decisions. :)
 
Hey guys, Im sure many of you here are interested in martial arts especially the various styles of Kung-Fu. Since I am experienced in a number of Kung Fu styles and have been practising for over 10 years, I thought of shedding some light on this wonderful art, so that all those aspiring to learn it can make wise and informed decisions regarding particular styles you would like to practice. It has been known that there are more than 800 styles of Kung Fu and thus a comparison with each of these styles will be impractical. Thus for starters I shall focus on the two main broad classifications of Kung Fu, the Northern Styles and The Southern Styles.

Northern Styles: Fluid, Elegant, Dynamic

If you were to watch someone trained in the northern style of kung fu vs someone trained in the southern style the difference would be apparent. Nothern styles are generally based around much wider stances, much higher kicks and greater mobility. Much of the whirling motion and spin kicks you see are typical of northern styles.

During the times of the Chou Dynasty,Northern China had a much rockier terrain and constant climbing up and down a hill would strengthen the legs of its people. The people from this region were generally of a much taller stature and better able to use long range kicks. With Mongolia to the north there was much greater need to focus army in this region as well. A martial arts style developed primarily for fighting in situations like this would be more fluid. With dynamics of war, one is constantly being pushed or pulled by soldiers on all sides and one must learn very fluid stances in order to react. It would be likely that a martial artist has a weapon in hand so kicks would be extremely useful.

Thus it is typically thought that this environment is what led to the development of northern styles of kung fu, in which kicks are used frequently and there is a lot of movement in one's stance. Northern Styles are characterized by their long range techniques, quick advances and retreats, agility, whirling or circular motions.

Examples: Chang quan, Xing yi quan
(One of Kano's styles in MK:DA)

Southern Styles: Stable, Powerful and Grounded

When the Qing Dynasty overther the Ming, the Shaolin temple in the Fuijan province was destroyed. The Shaolin masters who managed to escape fled to neighbouring provinces and there they developed an insurgency and would often train the locals and peasants to fight against the oppression. Since martial arts was prohibited, it was impossible to train as they have for centuries. The combat they would face was entirely different from clash of armies and the fighting techniques needed to adapt to these conditions.

In the south the terrain was much flatter, with less open spaces. Its people were shorter than those in the north and the cities were cropped up with densely packed buildings, restricting mobility within cities. More combat was also happening in small numbers in city streets. With an insurgent force training in secret, fights were usually one on one or a few fighters at a time, usually in very close proximity to one another in alleyways and streets with densely packed buildings surrounding them. Flourishing kicks and whirling blocks would not be as effective in such close combat, and southern styles adapted to meet these condtions. Martial Arts training was prohibited and hence one could not train in weapons and had to rely on his hands.

Low stances, Low kicks, greater use of hands and stability are all characteristic of southern styles. Many of the strikes are designed to get as much as power out of as little motion as possible and it is in tradition that you commonly hear of the 'one inch punch,' Stances had to be low to the ground, so that the fighter could remain grounded. Much of the fighting philosophy was geared towards economy of motion and restricting any uneccesary movement. (Bruce Lee would later strive to perfect this concept by creating Jeet Kune Do).

Southern styles thus became very external or hard styles. Hands replaced weapons so each strike had to do as much as damage as possible. Kicks were mostly retricted to striking below the waist.

Examples: Wing-Chun, Nan Quan

I hope this was informative to most here. I shall give a brief intro on the shaolin temple styles and animal styles in the next post and then focus on individual styles, stating its pros, cons and to what kind of people it would be suitable etc so that all aspirants can make informed decisions. :)

Very informative Little Jinko. When you mentioned about the Northern and Southern Styles, it kinda makes me think about the North Star's Hokuto Shinken (North Dipper Divine Fist) and the South Star's Nanto Seiken (South Dipper Sacred Fist) from Fist of the North Star. The only difference between that and the real life Kung Fu are the forms of the fighting style have been reversed. The North is powerful, grounded and stable, with a hint of Fluid. While the South is more elegant, fluid, and very dynamic.
 

mr fearless

New member
I've trained in boxing, wrestling, muay thai, kempo karate, ryu jiu-jistu, kick boxing, and brazillion jiu jitsu. Theese are great martial arts for fighting competitivley.
 

Reptile329

New member
If anyone here trains in Muay Thai and has some tips for kicking please feel free to send them why way Lol.

My punching is wicked, knees good, but my kicks are slacking real bad.

I punch left/kick right, which puts me at a disadvantage, so unfortunately my instructor has to get me to condition my weaker leg (left) to be the main kicking limb, which is making my kicking progress slower than most people.
 

Flying Jinko

New member
If anyone here trains in Muay Thai and has some tips for kicking please feel free to send them why way Lol.

My punching is wicked, knees good, but my kicks are slacking real bad.

I punch left/kick right, which puts me at a disadvantage, so unfortunately my instructor has to get me to condition my weaker leg (left) to be the main kicking limb, which is making my kicking progress slower than most people.
I dont have much experience in Muay Thai however during my earlier years while learning Kung Fu my left kicks were considerably weaker than my right ones as well, but leg weights and ankle weights helped in this regard. Try putting some weights on ur left leg and practice your kicks as usual. Majority of people have stronger leg muscles on the right than left since we tend to balance and use our right leg more. Thus strengthening your left leg muscles forcefully is one of the ways to improve ur kicks. It will be incredibly tough at first, but if you stick to it you will be able to make it par with ur right leg in no time. However weights are not recommended for everyone, so its better to ask your instructor first before trying it out.

Practice consistently, do double the number of kicks on your left and if possible try practicing on a kickbag for best results.
 

mr fearless

New member
You should be kicking with both legs. The lead leg is harder to kick with u just gotta learn how to throw your hip out 1st with it.
 

poptdp

New member
i love all types of martial arts, always have. i've done boxing, mma, krav maga, wing chun, jeet kune do and shaolin (also karate when i was little, but doesnt count cause i dont remember crap). currently doing MMA.

i may get a lot of hate for this, but this is all personal opinion, so dont hate. i believe MMA is the best to learn for ONE on ONE fights, and its not biased, i have tried multiple different styles and thats what i think. it teaches u clenching, take downs, striking, counters/reversals, ground work and pretty much everything you need for a FAIR one on one fight.

on the other hand, for a street fight involving weapons, or a THREE on ONE fight, MMA wont do u much good. i believe something like KRAV MAGA is the best. its used by the israeli military, teaches u how to defend against weapons, uses the most practical and efficient techniques (they also take into account the fact that you will have adrenaline pumping during a fight, and you will not be focusing on things like ur stance etc), and also emphasises fights with multiple opponents. they kinda teach u to "line up" ur opponents and keep one between the others and yourself, so u can take them on one at a time. some may say its logic, yes, but the practicality of the techniques they teach you is gold. as far as self defence goes, krav is the way to go.

my two cents.
 

Flying Jinko

New member
I agree with you 100%. Those two martial arts are definitely more suited for street fighting as compared to others and that is essentially a fact, most experienced martial artists should acknowledge without bias.

Both Krav Maga and MMA are newer martial arts as compared to other and have done away with a lot of wasted movement, stances etc and focuses on the core which is fighting.
 
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Solid0015

New member
I agree with you 100%. Those two martial arts are definitely more suited for street fighting as compared to others and that is essentially a fact, most experienced martial artists should acknowledge without bias.

This. When I was thirteen, I picked up free-form JKD and LOVED it. Now I'm at a gym taking Brazilian Jiu Jutsu, and modified Muay Thai. I feel like if I had AUTHENTIC training in Jeet, that'd be my go-to stand up martial art, mainly for its emphasis on speed and countering. But I agree, MMA has reallllllly come in handy outside of the gym. In the few fights I've been in, the minute I took them to the ground, it's like they didn't know what to do lol
 

poptdp

New member
I agree with you 100%. Those two martial arts are definitely more suited for street fighting as compared to others and that is essentially a fact, most experienced martial artists should acknowledge without bias.

Both Krav Maga and MMA are newer martial arts as compared to other and have done away with a lot of wasted movement, stances etc and focuses on the core which is fighting.

the thing about krav maga is they are constantly building on it and changing it too. if they find a more practical counter to a right hook for example, that becomes the new style. its not 'set in stone' like a lot of other martial arts, which is a good thing
 

drapture17

New member
I've been looking into Krav Maga. I have a bit of experience in other fighting styles, boxing mostly, but with more people being armed and Jiu Jitsu becoming more popular, I feel boxing on it's on won't do me much good.
 

mr fearless

New member
I've been looking into Krav Maga. I have a bit of experience in other fighting styles, boxing mostly, but with more people being armed and Jiu Jitsu becoming more popular, I feel boxing on it's on won't do me much good.

If your constantly punching and comboing someown who strictly uses jiu jitsu then there jiu jitsu is usless. They need to grab a hold of u first. Striking is more important than jiu jitsu. If your opponent can't get to u cuz ur out striking them then they can't hurt u.
 

Flying Jinko

New member
If your constantly punching and comboing someown who strictly uses jiu jitsu then there jiu jitsu is usless. They need to grab a hold of u first. Striking is more important than jiu jitsu. If your opponent can't get to u cuz ur out striking them then they can't hurt u.
I will have to disagree with that, the locks and grabs learnt Ju Jitsu are one of the best and most efficient methods to take down a person, especially if he keeps punching and kicking. Of course offensive martial arts such as boxing, Muay Thai will have an advantage while standing, but once they are grounded, its a whole new different game altogether.
 

FlawlessVictor

New member
I will have to disagree with that, the locks and grabs learnt Ju Jitsu are one of the best and most efficient methods to take down a person, especially if he keeps punching and kicking. Of course offensive martial arts such as boxing, Muay Thai will have an advantage while standing, but once they are grounded, its a whole new different game altogether.

I concur, neither should be ignored. Sometimes things may not go your way, and you need a "back up plan". Even for people that have more affinity for striking, they should at least have some grappling training to avoid situations when they are on their backs.
 
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Kobra

New member
I plan on taking Ju-Jitsu after I get a green or blue belt in Taekwondo. I want my ground game as good as my standing game.

I know my friend takes Ju-Jitsu, me and him practice and once he locks me in a hold. I dunno what to do.
 

mr fearless

New member
I fight. If your beating some one up on the fight and have basic knowlege of takedown defense then the jiu jitsu wnt work.
 

Flying Jinko

New member
I fight. If your beating some one up on the fight and have basic knowlege of takedown defense then the jiu jitsu wnt work.
Lol I take part in tournaments and have engaged in street fights as well (and doing it for more than 8 yrs for that matter). I dont think you really know what Ju Jitsu is about and how it is practiced. Contrary to popular believe Ju Jitsu is not just a ground based martial art and have answers for all situations you encounter in a fight. Every punch or kick(standing or crouching) to any part of the body can be countered with locks, grabs and takedowns in more than 100 different ways. Once a lock is on hold anyone who doesnt know how to escape it will be forced to submit.

This art has its origins in Japan, and was concepted by Samurais. As the Samurais were constantly in battle, they found it difficult and ineffective to engage armored opponents using punchs and kicks at close range (beyond the reach of their swords) and thus created a system that forces their opponents to submit in a single lock, throw or grapple.

Although I agree that most other martial arts have a slight advantage while standing, that doesnt entirely negate the effectiveness of Ju Jitsu. One punch or kick is all it takes to be brought down by a Ju Jitsu practitioner. I personally believe that using Ju Jitsu is the best way to approach any opponent, as it is the quickest way to end a fight plus the opponent doesnt get injured and also it doesnt violate the laws of most countries.
 

mr fearless

New member
Ik what ji-jitsu is. But the most practical form of it is brazillian. I'm trained in japaneese and brazillian jiu-jitsu and the chances of you hitting a japaneese jiu-jitsu move on someone are slim. Unless they are a complete muppet. I have never seen a sucessful japanesse jiu-jitsu fighter in any mma fight. I like it, its fun, and i would def use it if an opening was there but its very difficult. And the fastest way to end a fight is to punch them in da face.
 

Flying Jinko

New member
Ik what ji-jitsu is. But the most practical form of it is brazillian. I'm trained in japaneese and brazillian jiu-jitsu and the chances of you hitting a japaneese jiu-jitsu move on someone are slim. Unless they are a complete muppet.I have never seen a sucessful japanesse jiu-jitsu fighter in any mma fight. I like it, its fun, and i would def use it if an opening was there but its very difficult.
When I speak of Ju Jitsu, I speak for all its derivative martial arts as well, such as Brazilian, Judo, Hapkido, Aikido etc. All the forms have its pros and cons and all of them are quite practical in one form or other. As you know most martial artists these days do not stick to the traditional routes and all these arts are constantly evolving to suit various situations.And when you talk of ''praciticality'', there are two scenarios you need to consider.Competitive fighting and real fighting.If you are trained in any martial art wanting to pursue it solely for competitive purposes, chances of you holding your own in a real fight are slim compared to those who approach martial arts in an all rounded way. Moves that you are able to pull off at tournaments may prove ineffective in real. And why you may ask? This is because competitive training is geared towards scoring maximum points in one round, and to score a point, you are only allowed to strike in limited areas of the body. Thus a person training for competitive purposes will only learn to counter and strike at those areas in the body.

Thus Ju Jitsu as a self defense technique is a really good art and pretty safe as well though in inter martial arts tournaments it may not fair well, for the reasons I explained above. At the end of the day, the person with higher experience and skill is the person who wins, whichever martial arts he practices.

And the fastest way to end a fight is to punch them in da face.

This is a matter of choice really. If someone picks on you and wants to fight, you can be violent, rash and punch him on his face and make him bleed to show that you are bad ass and impress everyone watching and also get into trouble with the cops OR you can counter his attacks, lock him down, force him to submit in a safe way and get your point across. ;)
 

drapture17

New member
I will have to disagree with that, the locks and grabs learnt Ju Jitsu are one of the best and most efficient methods to take down a person, especially if he keeps punching and kicking. Of course offensive martial arts such as boxing, Muay Thai will have an advantage while standing, but once they are grounded, its a whole new different game altogether.

This is exactly why I was looking into an alternative discipline. I'm 6'1, 250lbs, I've been boxing since I was 11 and had some other type of experience between now and then. I can hold my own upright, I've never been on my back, but if that day arrives, I'd like to be prepared.
 
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